Honour Roll and Past Presidents

The Australian Wagyu Association is indebted to those individuals who have provided exceptional contributions to the industry.

In recognition of their services, Honorary Life Members and Hall of Fame recipients are voted on by the Board to acknowledge the time, effort and knowledge given by individuals to improve the Australian Wagyu industry.

Honorary Life Members

Peter Winkler
Peter Winkler is the founding member of the Australian Wagyu Association and served as the first President between 1989-1994.

Through Peter’s vision for Wagyu in Australia, the breed society has enabled the Australian Wagyu industry to grow domestically and internationally for both breeders and beef producers.


Keith Hammond
The Hammond family were one of the pioneers of the Australian Wagyu industry, establishing Robbins Island Wagyu on the remote northwest cape of Tasmania.

As the third president of the Association between 1997-1999, Keith Hammond was an active part of the Board for more than 10 years and the industry as a whole.


Bob Talbot
It was quickly evident to the Board that Bob Talbot’s business acumen and advertising expertise would be of enormous benefit to the Association.

Owning one of the largest advertising agencies in Australia at the time, Bob was more than capable of promoting Wagyu to great effect during his time on the Board and as President. While not an experienced breeder, Bob brought structure to the Association and provenance to the breed.


Nick and Vicki Sher
Nick and Vicki Sher have made significant on the ground contributions to the Australian Wagyu industry, establishing the first crossbred herd with Holsteins, the first airfreighted carton beef export and forging many new markets in the early years of the Association. We can also thank Vicki for her vision for Wagyu with the design of the AWA logo in the early 90s, which is still in use today.

Greg Gibbons
Greg Gibbons’ name goes hand in hand with Aronui feedlot, one of the first feedlots to accept Wagyu and Wagyu crossbred cattle for the industry.

Since 2002, Gibbo has worked tirelessly with the Wagyu industry to bring his extensive experience to feedlotting, breeding, performance and evaluation to improve the outcomes for breeders.


Dr Simon Coates
Dr Simon Coates is recognised for establishing one of the first Wagyu herds in Australia using imported Wagyu genetics from the US and Canada.

As the second president of the Association between 1994 – 1997, Simon oversaw substantial growth in membership and public awareness.


Arthur Dew
Arthur Dew’s Longford Station is well respected for its Fullbood production, producing some of the best Wagyu bulls in the country as well as a longstanding live export market with Japan.

An early pioneer in the industry, Arthur has a commitment to improving the genetics of the Australian herd.

Hall of Fame

Shogo Takeda    Inducted 2015
A breeder of Japanese Black Wagyu cattle in Japan for more than 50 years, Shogo Takeda was instrumental in releasing Wagyu genetics to the world and revered by many in the Australian industry.

In his own words (translated from Japanese), ”I exported Wagyu to the USA and Australia just wanting people all over the world to have great marbling Wagyu. The members of the Australian Wagyu Association have spread Wagyu worldwide which helped my dream come true.”


Chris Walker    Inducted 2015
Founder of Westholme Wagyu and one of the early importers of Wagyu into Australia. He surprised and maybe challenged some of the beliefs around the breed’s establishment outside Japan. In 1996 he exported 84 registered Fullblood females and three registered Fullblood sires and semen from three more, from Japan to the USA. The founding stock was selected for Fullblood production and a balance of prefectural genetics.

These animals produced embryos and semen for export to Westholme in Australia which developed into the world’s second-largest Fullblood Wagyu herd which was sold in its entirety to AACo in 2006.

Wally Rae    Inducted 2017
Wally secured the Australian semen rights to the first Fullblood cattle that left Japan in the 1990s and was involved in early Fullblood breeding in Australia, with the first Australian-born Fullblood bull born at his property.


Lachie Hart    Inducted 2018
Chief Executive Officer of Stockyard Beef, Lachie Hart was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018 in recognition of his contribution to the Australian Wagyu industry.

A family-owned business, Stockyard Beef is vertically integrated and one of Australia’s largest exporters of branded boxed Australian beef. Lachie has been a valuable member to the Board and served on many red meat industry councils including Australia Japan Business Cooperation, Red Meat Advisory Council and the Australia Japan FTA Taskforce.

Past Presidents

Since the Australian Wagyu Association (AWA) was first established, the Association and its members have made numerous contributions to developing the Wagyu industry under the leadership of various presidents. The AWA president works with the Executive Committee to set the strategic agenda for the Association.

AWA Presidents from 1989 to present

Peter Winkler 1989 – 1994
Dr Simon Coates 1994 – 1997
Keith Hammond 1997 – 1999
Bob Talbot 1999 – 2002
Peter Bishop 2002 – 2005
Tony Fitzgerald 2005 – 2007
Rick Hunter 2007- 2010
Joe Grose 2010 – 2011
Scott Hughes 2011 – 2013
Scott de Bruin 2013 – 2015
Peter Gilmour 2015 – 2018
Chantal Winter 2018 – 2019
Mike Buchanan 2019 – 2020
Charles Perry 2020 – present

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Important Notice and Disclaimer


It is very important that you appreciate when viewing the AWA database that the information contained on the AWA database, including but not limited to pedigree, DNA information, Estimated Breeding Values (EBVs) and Index values, is based on data supplied by members and/or third parties.

Whilst every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information reported through AWA, AWA officers and employees assume no responsibility for its content, use or interpretation. AWA disclaims all liability (including without limitation, liability in negligence) for all expenses, losses, damages and costs you may incur as a result of the use by you of the data on this AWA database and the information supplied by ABRI and AGBU being inaccurate or incomplete in any way for any reason.

Regarding EBVs and Index values, it is very important to appreciate, and you need to be aware that:

  • EBVs are derived using Wagyu Single Step BREEDPLAN technology developed independently by the Animal Genetics and Breeding Unit (AGBU), using the information contained within the AWA database.
  • AGBU is a joint venture of NSW Department of Primary Industries and the University of New England, which receives funding for this purpose from Meat and Livestock Australia Limited.
  • AWA relies solely on advice provided by AGBU and ABRI in accepting Wagyu Single Step BREEDPLAN software.
  • EBVs published in Wagyu Single Step BREEDPLAN are estimates of genetic potential of individual animals and may not reflect the raw animal phenotype.
  • EBVs can only be directly compared to other EBVs calculated in the same monthly Wagyu Group BREEDPLAN analysis.

Regarding pedigree and DNA testing results submitted to the AWA, it is very important to appreciate, and you need to be aware that:

  • Pedigree and DNA data submitted and supplied to AWA may have errors in it which cannot be detected without further DNA testing.
  • Technology may have advanced since a particular test was undertaken so that previous inaccuracies which were not detectable are now able to be detected by current testing technology.
  • AWA estimates that less than 1% of the pedigree entries, ownership or breeding details in the AWA Herdbook may have errors or which may be misleading. For this reason, users ought to consider if they need to obtain independent testing of the relevant animal (if possible) to ensure that the data is accurate.

Regarding prefectural content, it is very important to appreciate, and you need to be aware that:

  • Prefectural content is based on the estimation of prefectural origin from Japanese breeding records of 201 foundation sires and 168 foundation dams.  As genotype-based parent verification is not used in Japan, and full Japanese registration certificates are not available for all foundation animals, exact prefectural composition for these sires and dams cannot be validated.
  • The calculation of prefectural content for Australian Herdbook animals relies on the accuracy of pedigree records and DNA samples provided by AWA members.
  • The reporting of prefectural content for animals within the AWA Herdbook relies on the calculation provided by ABRI.

If you consider that you do not understand or appreciate the nature and extent of the data provided on this website or the EBVs of a particular animal, then AWA strongly recommends that you seek independent expert advice.